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Training Goldendoodles

May 20, 2020

What is important to know is that every dog must know the basic commands and must listen to you, especially in situations where other people are afraid of your pet. Do not play “aggressively” with your dog, as he can easily conclude that he should behave in other situations as well. Of course, that means that we always need to have certain things on our mind while training out pet.

Keep dogs away from small children they do not know. Both dogs and children can be frightened by sudden reactions. Explain to the children whether or not they can pet your dog.

Don’t scare the dog by taking it where there is loud music or simply follow the dog’s body language – if the dog has wagged its tail it is a sure sign that it is scared, scared or angry and that it is time to get out of the crowd. We know you love your dog, but there are places that are not for him.
As we know, the goldendoodle breed was created by crossing a poodle and a golden retriever. The goal was to create a hypoallergenic dog that would have all the qualities of both breeds. These dogs are very intelligent, friendly and easy to raise and train.  They adore children, people and other dogs. They need a lot of movement so they are not recommended to people who aren’t active. With average and above-average energy levels, Goldendoodles require daily exercise and love to go for walks, running, walks and swimming. Their playful nature and retriever genes make them great partners as well. Owners should aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise each day. A fenced yard is ideal for goldendoodles to rustle, but you shouldn’t keep them there all day. Whenever possible you need to take him out and train him how to behave while being outside that yard.

This would be an easy task also, because goldendoodles are intelligent and have a strong desire for obedience. Because of their obedience, they are very easy to train. It helps if you start their training early. They are easy to train, but require early socialization to avoid shyness. They respond best to positive, rewarding workouts and will be happy to show off their tricks for a delicious treat. Try that and you will see the results.

Without training, you can expect them to roll out the toilet paper, that you will miss the Thanksgiving turkey and the sofa cushions that will be arranged on the floor. Of course, goldendoodle’s playful nature is also quite charming. But, still most of us aren’t prepared for this type of behaviour.

The basic training consists in teaching your pet from the very beginning to perform a certain action on a given command, and to strengthen that action by repeating it. Prolonged repetition creates a habit and the dog mechanically performs a certain action on a given command. Training is successfully completed when the dog on precise commands performs precise actions that are planned for that command and always without error. This is also why you need to train your goldendoodle while he or she is still a puppy.

Goldendoodles have been used as pets, agility dogs, guide dogs, therapy dogs, diabetic dogs, as well as search and rescue dogs. Their love and patience have made them a popular choice for family dogs in recent year. he first three dogs to win the American Kennel Club obedience champion title after its introduction in 1977 were golden retrievers, proving their loyalty and ease of training. Poodles were originally bred as retrievers and water dogs, and both breeds scored in the top 5 among150 smartest dog breeds. These genes are passed on to goldendoodle, so owners can be convinced of a sporty, intelligent and obedient companion. So, don’t worry at all, because obviously your pet will obey every command you give to him. The training will go smoothly and you will be satisfied because your dog will follow all your instructions.

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