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Treatments For Pets

August 31, 2020

We are happy to note that the health of dogs and cats are given more attention these days.

For example, food for specific dog or cat conditions have been developed and are still being developed, and more natural treats are being produced for our pets. The best news is that natural or alternative remedies and approaches to certain medical conditions are now available and more accessible

But the said natural treatment should always  be given to pets in combination with Western medicine, and with the go-signal of  licensed veterinarians.

One dog who benefited from natural treatment is Chacha, a rescued dog of Save Animals of Love and Light (Save ALL Inc.). She  has started to feel pain due to a spinal problem that is said to be common among Maltese dogs.

While there are pain killers for dogs, she can not be put on pain killers everyday as the medicine can damage her liver and kidneys.  Joint supplements can not be given often also as she developed pus in her private part when we gave it every day. The vet explained that too much joint supplement can cause an increase in sugar level.

To manage the pain, the vet suggested acupuncture. We are glad it worked well for Chacha.

Since she underwent acupuncture treatment, she can stay standing up for a longer period of time now, and she can walk a longer distance.  She now goes for acupuncture treatment every other week.

The cost is  P2,000.00 per session.

Acupuncture and other natural treatments are now accepted in the Philippines. Some vets do recommend them as supplemental treatment to Western treatments.

In “Natural and Alternative Pet Remedies That Humans Use, Too,” Fetch by WebMD listed natural treatments for our pets:

Acupuncture

This ancient Chinese healing method uses tiny needles to stimulate specific parts of your pet’s body. Acupuncture can improve organ function, soothe muscles, get the blood flowing, and release feel-good hormones. It’s good for animals with muscle or skeletal issues, skin problems, respiratory problems, or digestive troubles.

Aromatherapy

The smell of certain plants and oils is the basis for this therapy. It’s gentle and noninvasive, and it can help treat a four-legged friend who has anxiety or other forms of emotional or physical stress. Check with your vet first, though. Some essential oils can be toxic if your pet drinks them. Others could cause allergic reactions if you put them on his skin.

Flower Essences

Another way to harness plant power to calm an anxious animal friend is to use flower essences — a diluted herbal solution that you can drop in his water or directly in his mouth. Often you can find this remedy as a blend of several flower essences in one.

Chiropractic

Dogs or cats who have a slipped disk or pinched nerve may benefit from chiropractic. A trained practitioner uses gentle pressure on joints to realign the spine and keep feeling and function flowing in muscles, organs, and tissues. It might help with other problems too, like epilepsy, skin disorders, or behavior issues.

Herbal Medicine

Supplementing your pet’s diet with herbal medicine might treat digestive issues, kidney and bladder disease, parasites, skin problems, and bone or tissue injuries. It’s important not to use herbs without consulting a vet first — some are toxic to pets, and others may cancel out when used as a combo.

Massage

Massages are more than just a menu item at the day spa. Done right, they can ease your pet’s cramps, reduce pain from injuries, and improve circulation. Find a trained massage therapist who specializes in animals, so they know which muscles and soft tissues to target.

Osteopathy

This holistic approach to medicine is based on moving and handling your pet’s muscles and joints in a specific way to help his body heal itself. You might turn to osteopathy to help a pet who has trouble walking, or who has stiffness, problems holding his head well, muscle tension, or changes in behavior or digestion.

Hydrotherapy

Water can help your pet work out injured muscles without putting weight on them. Hydrotherapy may also help treat certain behaviors. A trainer will spend time with your pup (or cat, though they tend to be warier of getting wet) in a pool swimming, walking on a treadmill, or playing therapeutic games.

Nutritional Therapy

Your companion’s diet can have a big impact on his overall wellness. The foods you choose may also help improve certain health problems like heart disease. Together with your vet, you can craft meals that focus on the specific nutrients that best address your pet’s needs.

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